Pin It

Widgets

DUNE by Frank Herbert

This is yet another one of those books I had put off, one of those classics I had deferred after hearing so much buzz about: movies, video games like Command&Conquer, and a whole lot of commotion that seemed too good to be true. "As good as The Lord of the Rings" said Arthur Clarke, one of the pillars of modern SciFi. Really? I thought to myself, not believing it for a second.

The presence of this book was itching at the back of my head, urging me to find out if it was as good as people said it was. 

I finally decided to try it out. At first the read was jittery, not easy at all to grasp it's simple-complex narration that uses solid sentences charged with meaning and depth. Gom jabbar, the word has lingered in my mind ever since. Muad'Dib, the name has stayed with me after a long yet fruitful read.

I was stunned, struck by surprise after surprise to find such a deep, great, amazing read within my grasp. I could not believe the complexity, the details of a world so crude, raw, and hostile as Dune, and yet, so promising. The Little Makers, the Worms, the Fremen, CHOAM, the universe within Herberts's universe is vast and hopefully youthful, full of a breeze profound enough to stay, to linger, such that I hold Dune as one of the greatest books I've read, ever.

Perhaps it's what happened to me after reading Dune. I was sad, terrified of reading something subpar. I got over it, but never stopped wishing I was back with Lady Jessica, Paul Muad'Dib, the profound yet simple-natured culture of the Fremen. I don't believe this book needs neither more credibility nor reviews to convince the world that it is worth your while. It has earned its place in the cosmos of literature and beyond. 

No comments:

Post a Comment

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...